Gesamtzahl der Seitenaufrufe

Follower

Mittwoch, 20. Juni 2018

Timely US Offshore Wind Construction Support Vessel Proposed

Timely US Offshore Wind Construction Support Vessel Proposed

By [Associate Editor]
REW_TimelyUSOffshoreVessel
Artist's rendition of “motion-compensated feeder solution” for US offshore wind project construction support. Credit: GustoMSC/Barge Master
Two companies based in The Netherlands have proposed developing a near-term marine vessel solution for delivering wind turbine parts for the construction of new U.S. offshore wind projects planned over the next few years.
GustoMSC and Barge Master said they will work together on the development of a “motion-compensated feeder solution” that will be Jones Act compliant. According to the companies, a platform with Barge Master’s motion-compensated technology — BM-T700 — will be placed on a U.S. flagged offshore vessel or a seagoing barge in order to feed the wind turbine components to the offshore installation site to be installed by a wind turbine installation jack-up vessel.
GustoMSC will perform the naval engineering and the integration of the BM-T700 platform onto a new or existing feeder barge. The Jones Act, which has been commonly assumed to apply to offshore wind projects with foundations affixed to the U.S. outer continental shelf, requires turbine components to be carried by a U.S.-flagged vessel.

The company said that although it “sees sufficient potential for larger purpose-built Jones Act compliant installation jack-ups to cope with the expected increase in turbine size, weights and hub heights, this [feeder barge] is a solid solution for the first wave of U.S. projects within the remaining timeframe.”
GustoMSC added that, by offering this steady top feeder barge, the solution offers the ability to “overcome current hurdles and make the successful development of the first U.S. offshore wind projects possible within time and budget constraints.”
A November 2017 study prepared by GustoMSC determined that it would cost about $222 million and take 34 months to build a Jones Act compliant purpose-built installation vessel. The study also found that a purpose-built feeder vessel would cost $87 million with a construction time of 25 months.

NPR's Planet Money Features the World's Biggest Battery

NPR's Planet Money Features the World's Biggest Battery

Editor's Take: If you haven’t heard National Public Radio’s Planet Money and you’re into energy storage and renewables, this episode of the award-winning podcast is sure to please. In it, Dan Charles and Scott Flake take a look at how pumped hydropower can work alongside intermittent renewables like solar and wind to provide the longer-range, grid-scale energy storage that is necessary in order to keep the world transitioning to a world primarily powered by clean energy.
 
Want to learn even more about how these technologies can work together? Visit the Renewable Energy World and Hydro World team in Charlotte, NC next week for the first-ever Grid-Scale Energy Storage Summit, taking place on June 25-26 at the Charlotte Convention Center. Hope to see you there!

Can Climate Change Be Stopped by Turning Air Into Gasoline?

Can Climate Change Be Stopped by Turning Air Into Gasoline?

file
Rendering of Carbon Engineering’s air contactor design. This unit would be one of several that would collectively capture 1M tonnes of CO2 per year. Credit: Carbon Engineering Ltd.
The headline of this article was composed simply by rephrasing the title of a popular recent piece in The Atlantic
 — “Climate Change Can Be Stopped by Turning Air into Gasoline” — as a question. That article, reporting on research by Harvard professor David Keith and colleagues, made a bold claim that, if true, suggests the global climate crisis can affordably be resolved with new technology. We set out to see whether Keith’s findings are as Earth shaking as the article’s title suggests, or something a little less tectonically noticeable. In addition to his post at Harvard, Keith is also a founder and executive chairman of Carbon Engineering, a Bill Gates-funded company that studies how to extract carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere. The basic process summarized in the article involves removing CO2 from the air, then combining it with hydrogen to produce a liquid fuel such as gasoline. This would, it is implied, entail no net new carbon emissions. Alternatively, the carbon taken from the air could be sequestered underground, thus reducing the amount of carbon in the atmosphere. The process has been tested in a pilot plant for a couple of years, and Keith and his colleagues have plans for a commercial industrial operation to be up and running perhaps as soon as 2021. The article ends with a discussion of affordability, suggesting that all annual global carbon emissions could be removed by the process for “something like 3 to 5 percent of global GDP,” or approximately the amount by which the world’s economy grows in a good year. A mere pittance!
It sounds too good to be true. Is it?
We decided to dig into the original research paper on which The Atlantic article is based. While the article reads as if the only input necessary to obtaining a bountiful output of carbon-neutral fuel is money, the details in the research paper show otherwise.
The research paper is a description of Keith et al.’s technique of CO2 removal from air with four possible configurations depending on whether the output is targeted for sequestration or for fuel production. The initial input is air, the final output is CO2.

Carbon Engineering's air contactor structure, which is modelled on industrial cooling tower design and uses a strong hydroxide solution to capture CO2 and convert it into carbonate. Credit: Carbon Engineering Ltd.
The removal process is highly energy-intensive, requiring both electricity and fuel. The fans to move air from which carbon is to be extracted require 61 kWh for each tonne (i.e., metric ton, or 2205 pounds) of CO2 captured. So scaling this process to remove, say, 1 billion tonnes of CO2 (1/37th of global emissions) would require 61 TWh, or more than all the solar power generation in the U.S. in 2017. To remove all current emissions—which would be necessary to prevent the concentration of CO2 in the atmosphere from continuing to rise—the equivalent of 75 percent of all U.S. electricity consumption in 2017 would be needed. This is just for the fans, and does not count the energy needed for the pumps, motors, and compressors in the system. The CO2 compressor itself requires 132 kWh per tonne of CO2—about twice the energy needed for fans.
The Keith process gleaned significant other press coverage in addition to The Atlantic article cited above. A National Geographic piece suggests that the entire process could be carbon neutral if it were run solely on renewable electricity. In theory that’s true, but the pilot plant currently uses fuel (8.8 GJ of natural gas, or 7600 cubic feet, per tonne of CO2), mainly to run the calciner unit that removes CO2 from calcium carbonate. (CBC reporting notes that the process emits a half tonne of CO2 for each tonne captured.) The calciner, like ones used in the cement production industry, runs at 1650 degrees F; currently there are no commercial electric calciners available for such an application. The other high-temperature technology required is the slaker (operating at 575 degrees F), which also currently uses fuel. As we have noted elsewhere, in a book-length discussion of the renewable energy transition, high-temperature processes are a huge challenge to decarbonization.
It’s unclear from press coverage whether the Keith pilot project is actually producing fuel. The research paper does mention the pilot plant, running in BC since 2015, but the technical description and cost estimates say nothing about a Fisher-Tropsch unit (which would be required to turn CO2 and hydrogen into fuel).
Turning CO2 into fuel is problematic from several angles. First of all, CO2 is a very poor feedstock for the Fischer-Tropsch process (which converts a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen into liquid fuel). Carbon dioxide is energetically very stable, so lots of energy is required to convert it into CO and O2 in the initial stages of the Fischer-Tropsch process. Moreover, a hydrogen source is needed; this is typically provided by a feedstock fossil fuel such as coal or natural gas, but in this case the plan is to derive hydrogen from water using electrolysis—a process with many inherent inefficiencies. Even using fossil fuels as the feedstock, the Fischer-Tropsch process is not a very efficient conversion process, with typical mass yields ranging between 25 and 28 percent of the input products.
So in sum, what we have here is a complex and energy-intensive process to capture CO2 from air, joined with a conventional Fischer-Tropsch process using a low-quality feedstock. The cost estimate for CO2 capture, which is lower than estimates for other technologies, is questionable and depends on continued low energy prices; no cost estimate is provided for the carbon-neutral fuel to be produced.
Energetically, the whole project is a disaster. It entails manufacturing a fuel from component molecules, in contrast to our “free” access to the chemical energy contained in buried hydrocarbons. The energy delivered in the final fuel is substantially less than the energy used to run the process. Some will say that’s not a problem in principle, because we customarily run power plants at 65 percent loss to get electricity. However, the coal or natural gas going to the power plant has a highly positive initial energy balance (i.e., the fuel contains much more energy than was required to extract and transport it) that remains positive even when discounted by 65 percent. Our friend, ecologist Bill Rees describes the Keith process this way:
“It’s like trying to run a hydro dam continuously by pumping the water back uphill to the reservoir: it can’t be done as a closed system because the energy required for pumping is quantitatively greater than what the turbines produce.”
The Keith process, however, is not a closed system—there are substantial external energy inputs to it, and those inputs could potentially be provided by renewable electricity from solar or wind power (however, as noted above, there would still be significant challenges to running high-temperature sub-processes with electricity from whatever source, as existing fuels do this job so much cheaper). The process might be considered in a situation where a liquid fuel is absolutely necessary (maybe for backup generators in hospitals). But it is certainly not the answer to large-scale substitution of hydrocarbon liquids.
There’s an over-arching question back of all the technical details about scalability and resource requirements: Is a costly, energy-intensive, and inefficient process like the one under discussion the best way to reduce atmospheric CO2 or produce fuel? Perhaps we should try thinking differently about what we need liquid fuel for in the first place, and how to dramatically reduce that demand. And perhaps we should look to more sustainable, nature-based ways of sequestering carbon.
Further, the transition away from our current societal dependence on depleting, climate-changing fossil fuels will almost certainly entail a redesign of our economic system so that it no longer depends on constant growth. Even if the Keith process works as advertised, if fully implemented its cost would, as mentioned above, be equivalent to current world annual GDP growth. But policy makers have refused even to consider post-growth policies as a component of climate action. The Keith process is billed as a lifeline for our current way of life, but in fact it doesn’t do much to address the core challenges we face. 

Since 1995, David Fridley (left) has been a staff scientist at the Energy Analysis Program at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in California. He is also deputy group leader of Lawrence Berkeley’s China Energy Group, which collaborates with China on end-user energy efficiency, government energy management programs, and energy policy research. Mr. Fridley has nearly 30 years of experience working and living in China in the energy sector, and is a fluent Mandarin speaker. Prior to joining the Lab, he spent 12 years as a consultant on downstream oil markets in the Asia-Pacific region and as business development manager for Caltex China. He has written and spoken extensively on the energy and ecological limits of biofuels. David is co-author with Richard Heinberg of Our Renewable Future: Laying the Path for One Hundred Percent Clean Energy (2016).
Richard Heinberg is one of the world’s foremost advocates for a shift from fossil fuel dependence. He is Senior Fellow at Post Carbon Institute, the author of 13 books, and his essays have been published in dozens of places such as Nature, The Wall Street Journal, CityLab, and Pacific Standard. Richard’s animations Don’t Worry, Drive On, Who Killed Economic Growth? and 300 Years of Fossil Fuels in 300 Seconds (winner of a YouTubes’s/DoGooder Video of the Year Award) have been viewed by nearly two million people.

AT&T ‘Goes Big’ on Wind Power in Texas

AT&T ‘Goes Big’ on Wind Power in Texas

By
REW_ATTGoesBigWind
AT&T last week said it is adding to its wind power program with the purchase of 300 MW from two new wind farms in Wilbarger and Hardeman counties in Texas.
The agreement builds on the company’s agreement with subsidiaries of renewable energy developer NextEra Energy Resources to purchase power from two wind projects in Webb and Duval counties in Texas and Caddo County, Oklahoma. AT&T said that together, the wind power purchases total 820 MW and represent one of the largest corporate renewable energy purchases in the U.S.
“We’re going big on renewable energy,” Joe Taylor, vice president of global tech optimization and implementation, AT&T, said in a statement. “It’s a clean, abundant, renewable source of home-grown power. As one of the world’s largest companies, our investments can help scale this critical energy source for America’s transition to a low-carbon economy.”
AT&T also said that it will make a $50,000 contribution to Texas State Technical College (TSTC) to create the AT&T Wind Energy Scholarship fund. The fund provides financial assistance for students earning a TSTC wind energy degree or certificate and is open exclusively to students from counties with AT&T-backed wind farms.
Lead image credit: Leaflet | CC BY-SA 3.0 | Wikimedia Commons

Licht aus, Spot an – pv magazine top business model für The Mobility House

Licht aus, Spot an – pv magazine top business model für The Mobility House


Großartige Ideen werden manchmal aus Zwängen geboren. So ist es auch im Fall des Großspeichers in der „Johan-Cruijff-Arena“ in Amsterdam. Um das Fußballstadion fit für die Europameisterschaft 2020 zu machen, war Henk van Raan, Innovation Director der Johan-Cruijff-Arena, auf der Suche nach einem innovativen und nachhaltigen Konzept für die Notstromversorgung des Stadions.
Er beauftragte das Münchner Technologieunternehmen The Mobility House (TMH) damit, ein geeignetes Konzept auf Basis eines Energiespeichers zu entwickeln. Als Vorlage diente dabei der bereits 2016 über ein Joint Venture realisierte Second-Use-Speicher mit gebrauchten Lithium-Ionen-Batterien aus Elektrofahrzeugen in Lünen. Diese Art von Recycling ermöglicht es, große Energiespeicher zu einem attraktiven Preis zu errichten und dabei Batterien zu nutzen, die bereits das Ende ihres CO2-Lebenszyklus erreicht haben.
Gemeinsam mit dem holländischen Bau- und Technikkonzern BAM, Elektronikhersteller Eaton und Elektroauto-Pionier Nissan begann TMH, den Speicher mit drei Megawatt Leistung und 2,8 Megawattstunden Kapazität in Amsterdam zu installieren. Bei den verwendeten Batterien handelt es sich ausschließlich um Elektroautobatterien von Nissan, die Kapazität entspricht der Batteriekapazität von rund 150 Nissan-Leaf-Fahrzeugen.

„Wir haben eine Mischung aus First- und Second-Life-Batterien genutzt, auch weil es noch nicht genug gebrauchte Batterien aus den Fahrzeugen gab“, erzählt TMH-Gründer und CEO Thomas Raffeiner. Die bereits in den Elektroautos eingesetzten Batteriespeicher seien vor ihrem Einsatz von Nissan/Eaton einzeln getestet und nach Leistung sortiert worden. Die Software von TMH optimiert die Kommunikation mit den Fahrzeugbatterien und bildet zugleich die Schnittstelle zum Energiemanagement vor Ort und den vorgelagerten Netzbetreibern.
Mit dem Speicher sei es möglich, die Stromversorgung im Fall eines Blackouts für mindestens eine und bis zu drei Stunden sicherzustellen. „Eine intelligente Steuerung entscheidet dabei, welche Verbraucher weiterhin erforderlich sind und mit Strom versorgt werden oder abgeschaltet werden können. Dabei wird auch einkalkuliert, ob mit einem nur kurzfristigen oder lang anhaltenden Stromausfall zu rechnen ist“, sagt Raffeiner.
Damit bietet der Speicher eine zukunftsträchtige Alternative zu den Dieselgeneratoren, die bislang die Notstromversorgung übernehmen, und stellt zudem einen zentralen Baustein dar, um die sichere Energieversorgung während der Europameisterschaft 2020 zu gewährleisten.
Die Notstromversorgung und auch das Peak-Shaving während Großveranstaltungen ist jedoch noch längst nicht alles, was der Speicher leisten kann. In dem Fußballstadion finden zwar auch noch andere Veranstaltungen wie Konzerte statt, doch längst nicht jeden Tag. Da diese Art von Events gut planbar ist, hat sich TMH auch entschieden, den Batteriespeicher für die Erbringung von Primärregelleistung zu nutzen. Derzeit finden die Ausschreibungen dafür eine Woche im Voraus statt, bald soll der Mechanismus auf tägliche Auktionen umgestellt werden. Rund 100.000 Euro pro Megawatt und Jahr an Einnahmen lassen sich Raffeiner zufolge damit verdienen.
Die Ladung der Batterien erfolgt teilweise auch direkt vom Stadiondach. Auf der Arena befindet sich eine Ein-Megawatt-Photovoltaikanlage. Den Speicher für die Eigenverbrauchsoptimierung zu nutzen, sei ein weiteres Ziel des Projekts, so Raffeiner weiter. Langfristig sei geplant, dass kein Solarstrom mehr ins Netz eingespeist werden müsse, sondern dieser ausschließlich lokal im Stadion verbraucht wird.
Dabei sei künftig auch denkbar, dass der Solarstrom nicht nur im, sondern auch vor dem Stadion gebraucht wird. „Noch in diesem Jahr wollen wir 15 bis 20 Ladepunkte für Elektrofahrzeuge installieren“, berichtet Raffeiner. Einige davon sollen auch bidirektional sein und alle über ein intelligentes Lade- und Energiemanagement verfügen.
TMH will die Besitzer von Elektrofahrzeugen locken, dass sie während der Veranstaltungen ihre Batterien als zusätzliche Speicher zur Verfügung stellen. Je nach Ladezustand ihrer Fahrzeuge könnten sie dann angeben, dass TMH auf einige Prozent zugreifen und diese für die eigenen
Dienstleistungen nutzen dürfe, erklärt Raffeiner. Sie würden dafür im Gegenzug auch entschädigt, etwa mit freiem Eintritt oder Getränken. Dieses Gesamtkonzept, das neben den verschiedenen Speicherdienstleistungen auch noch die Elektrofahrzeuge mit einbindet, hat die Jury überzeugt. The Mobility House erhält daher für sein Konzept in Amsterdam das Prädikat „top business model“.
Mittelfristig sollen 100 bis 200 uni- und bidirektionale Ladepunkte im Parkhaus der Arena entstehen, die intelligent mit dem Großspeicher gekoppelt werden. Erste kommerzielle Pilotprojekte dieser Art werden von TMH bereits an anderen Orten umgesetzt. „Ich bin überzeugt, dass dies in drei bis fünf Jahren ein neues, attraktives Geschäftsmodell sein wird“, so der CEO von The Mobility House.

Eon bietet Photovoltaik-Anlage und Ladeanschluss im Paket an

Eon bietet Photovoltaik-Anlage und Ladeanschluss im Paket an


Eon will Besitzern von Elektroautos künftig die Möglichkeit geben, ihr Fahrzeug mit Solarstrom aus der Photovoltaik-Anlage vom eigenen Dach zu beladen. Dazu wird der Energiekonzern mit dem Produkt „Drive Ready“ eine 2-in-1-Installation von Photovoltaik-Anlagen und Anschluss von Wallboxen anbieten. „Bei der Dimensionierung neuer Solaranlagen kalkuliert Eon auf Wunsch neben dem aktuellen Energiebedarf im Haushalt gleich den zusätzlich anfallenden Verbrauch eines Elektroautos mit ein“, heißt es von dem Energiekonzern am Dienstag. Die Ladeboxen haben eine Leistung von bis zu 22 Kilowatt. Der passende Anschluss gehöre auch zum Angebot und werde direkt verlegt. Nicht jedoch die Wallbox selbst, wie ein Eon-Sprecher auf Anfrage erklärt. Wenn der Kunde diesbezüglich bereits klare Vorstellungen habe würden diese natürlich auch mit umgesetzt. Das Erweiterungspaket gilt Eon zufolge exklusiv in Kombination mit einer neuen Photovoltaik-Anlage.
Der Energiekonzern trifft damit auch einen Nerv der Zeit. Nach einer repräsentativen Forsa-Umfrage im Auftrag des Bundesverbands Solarwirtschaft (BSW-Solar) würden 90 Prozent der Autofahrer, die den Kauf eines Elektroautos erwägen, dieses am liebsten mit Solarstrom aus der eigenen Photovoltaik-Anlage laden. 73 Prozent der Befragten sprechen sich demnach dafür aus, die Solarenergie stärker auszubauen, damit Elektroautos klimafreundlich mit Ökostrom fahren können. Für etwa 40 Prozent der Autofahrer komme die Anschaffung eines Elektrofahrzeugs bereits grundsätzlich in Frage. Für die restlichen Autofahrer sprechen vor allem die geringe Reichweite, das fehlende Ladenetz und die hohen Anschaffungskosten gegen einen Kauf. Zwei Drittel der Befragten gibt dem BSW-Solar zufolge an, dass Förderprogramme für den Aufbau eines flächendeckenden Netzes mit Ladestationen besonders geeignet sind, um die Elektromobilität voranzubringen. Gut die Hälfte plädiert für höhere Kaufprämien und Steuerrabatte für Elektroautos sowie die schnelle Umstellung öffentlicher Fuhrparks. „Sinn und Erfolg der Elektromobilität hängen entscheidend von einem stärkeren Ausbau der Solarenergie und Ladeinfrastruktur ab“, sagt Carsten Körnig, Hauptgeschäftsführer des BSW-Solar.
Noch ist die Zahl von Elektroautos in Deutschland überschaubar. Dennoch setzt Eon bereits jetzt auf das Angebot. „Unsere Kunden wollen schon bei der Planung der Solaranlage sicherstellen, dass später auch genügend Strom für das Laden eines Elektroautos zur Verfügung steht. Mit Drive Ready erfüllen wir diesen Wunsch und sorgen gleichzeitig dafür, dass jederzeit und ohne viel Aufwand eine Ladelösung an den bereits mitinstallierten Ladeanschluss angebracht werden kann“, erklärt Sebastian Eisenberg, zuständig für das deutsche Solargeschäft bei Eon. Um nicht nur in der eigenen Garage Solarstrom tanken zu können, könnten die Autofahren auch unterwegs über die virtuelle Eon Solarcloud Solarstrom beziehen, wie es weiter hieß.

QVSD: App statt Klemmbrett aufs Dach nehmen

QVSD: App statt Klemmbrett aufs Dach nehmen


Der Qualitätsverband Solar- und Dachtechnik, kurz QVSD, will die Prüfung und Dokumentation von Photovoltaik-Anlagen standardisieren, vereinfachen und vertrauenswürdiger machen. Dazu stellt er eine Digitale Service Plattform vor. Sie erlaubt zum einen größeren Betrieben, die Übergabe von Aufträgen an Servicetrupps oder Servicepartner, und diesen genauso wie kleineren eigenständigen Installateuren, die Prüfung zu vereinfachen. Über Eingabemasken gibt die mit der Plattform verbundene App vor, was man auf dem Dach messen und prüfen muss. Die Ergebnisse und Fotos, die man zur Überprüfung macht, fließen direkt in die Dokumentation ein. Diese lässt sich nach dem Ortstermin noch einmal bearbeiten. Wenn sie dann abgespeichert wird, lässt sie sich nicht mehr verändern.
„Das hat den Zweck, dass eine fälschungssichere Dokumentation entsteht, die auch vor Gericht bestand hat und die Versicherungen nutzen können“, sagt Mischa Paterna, Geschäftsführer von Suncycle, dessen Unternehmen die Plattform zusammen mit dem IT-Spezialisten ELB-BIT entwickelt hat. Vom QVSD stammen die Leitfäden, die in der App hinterlegt sind. Das besondere ist, dass diese kontinuierlich aktualisiert werden, so dass der Nutzer die Prüfung immer nach dem aktuellen Stand der Technik durchführt.

Mischa Paterna und Andreas Kleefisch, Partner bei Baumeister Rechtsanwälte und stellvertretender Vorsitzender des QVSD, können Sie auf der Intersolar auf dem pv magazine Quality Roundtable am Donnerstag um 10:00 Uhr und auf dem QVSD Business Breakfast am Freitag um 8:15 Uhr treffen. Bei dem Quality Roundtable wird die App auf einem Poster vorgestellt. Bei dem Business Breakfast wird sie Mischa Paterna in einem Vortrag vorstellen, gefolgt von einer Einschätzung der Mannheimer Versicherung zu Vorteile von verbindlichen Inspektionsvorgaben.
Für die alten Hasen mag die App nur eine Erleichterung sein, für die weniger Erfahrenen dürfte es die Arbeitsweise ändern, so Paternas Einschätzung. „Ich zwinge die Servicemitarbeiter damit zu einem bestimmten Qualitätsstandard“, sagt er. Das wiederum dürfte die Versicherungen freuen. So hat die Mannheimer Versicherung beschlossen, nur noch Deckungszusagen nach erfolgreichem QVSD-Check zu erteilen. „Hiermit setzt die Mannheimer ein klares Zeichen für Qualität und positioniert sich als Vorreiter digitaler Serviceprozesse“, sagt Paterna. Es ist im Übrigen möglich, die App für sein eigenes Unternehmen zu branden und eine eigene Datenbank aufzubauen. Für eine einfache Nutzung ist sie beim QVSD kostenfrei erhältlich.

VDMA: Investitionstätigkeit bei Photovoltaik-Herstellern geht zurück

VDMA: Investitionstätigkeit bei Photovoltaik-Herstellern geht zurück


Im ersten Quartal 2018 war die Investitionstätigkeit der Photovoltaik-Hersteller in neues Produktionsequipment eher verhalten. Die Umsätze der deutschen Maschinen- und Anlagenbauer seien gegenüber dem Vorquartal um 48 Prozent gesunken, teilte der Verband am Dienstag mit. Im Vergleich zum Jahresquartal hätten sie jedoch um 48 Prozent höher gelegen. Noch sind die Auftragsbücher nach VDMA-Angaben gut gefüllt. Das Verhältnis von Bestellungen zu ausgelieferten Anlagen („Book-to-Bill“) lag im ersten Quartal 2018 demnach bei 0,4. Die Exportquote habe 93 Prozent betragen.
„Die bisher hohe Investitionstätigkeit der Solarzellenhersteller in den Ausbau bestehender und neuer Produktionskapazitäten geht zurück, die Produktion ist aber noch ausgelastet“, fasst Peter Fath, Geschäftsführer der RCT Solutions GmbH und Vorsitzender des Vorstands von VDMA Photovoltaik Produktionsmittel, die Lage zusammen. „Ferner beobachten wir eine Reduktion der Equipment Preise. Neue Aufträge kamen verstärkt für PERC und Black Silicon Anlagen im kristallinen Silizium sowie aus dem Dünnschichtbereich.“ Ungebremst sei dabei der Trend, neue Produktionstechniken in Form von Upgrades bei bestehenden Fertigungslinien zu implementieren.
Insgesamt hat der Auftragseingang gegenüber dem vierten Quartal 2017 deutlich nachgelassen. Es sei ein Minus von 51 Prozent gewesen, hieß es weiter. Regional kämen weiterhin die meisten Bestellungen aus Asien mit 75 Prozent, allerdings nur etwa die Hälfte davon aus China. „Die Aufträge aus Asien zeigen inzwischen eine breitere Streuung in verschiedene asiatische Länder. Speziell der hohe Anteil für Equipment zur Herstellung von Dünnschicht-Modulen zeigt, dass deutsches Produktionsequipment gefragt ist“, sagte Jutta Trube, Leiterin VDMA Photovoltaik Produktionsmittel. 16 Prozent der neuen Aufträge stammten im ersten Quartal aus Deutschland.
Ihren Hauptumsatz machen die Photovoltaik-Zulieferer vornehmlich weiterhin in Asien; 86 Prozent entfielen auf Ostasien. 40 Prozent entfielen davon auf Aufträge aus China, gefolgt von Taiwan mit sieben Prozent. Deutschland liege ebenfalls bei einem Umsatzanteil von sieben Prozent und damit klar vor dem übrigen Europa mit vier Prozent und Amerika mit nur noch drei Prozent Umsatzanteil im ersten Quartal 2018. Bei den Technologien war zu Jahresbeginn weiterhin die Dünnschicht-Photovoltaik besonders gefragt. 61 Prozent des Umsatzes entfiel auf dieses Segment, gefolgt von dem Produktionsequipment für die Zelle (32 Prozent).

Photovoltaik-Handelsstreit: Offenbar erneute Prüfung des Undertakings bei EU-Kommission beantragt

Photovoltaik-Handelsstreit: Offenbar erneute Prüfung des Undertakings bei EU-Kommission beantragt


Bislang sind es mehr Spekulationen, die seit einigen Tagen die Runde machen, doch es scheint einen neuerlichen Antrag auf Überprüfung des Undertakings bei der EU-Kommission in Brüssel zu geben. Bis zum 3. Juni musste ein entsprechender Prüfantrag eingereicht werden. Damit könnten die bestehenden Anti-Dumping- und Anti-Subventionszölle nicht zum 3. September auslaufen, sondern nochmals verlängert werden. Eine offizielle Bestätigung, dass ein solcher Antrag vorliegt, gibt es jedoch nicht.
„Nach EU-Recht darf sich die Kommission nicht dazu äußern, ob ein Antrag auf Überprüfung durch die Industrie vorliegt oder nicht, oder ob sie beabsichtigt, eine solche Überprüfung durchzuführen“, erklärte eine Sprecherin der Generaldirektion Handel auf Anfrage von pv magazine. Sie verwies darauf, dass über eine Einleitung einer Überprüfung im offiziellen EU-Handelsblatt informiert werden. Sofern es keine Bekanntmachung gebe, liefen die aktuellen Maßnahmen am 3. September aus, so die Sprecherin weiter. Theoretisch hat die EU-Kommission bis dahin auch Zeit zu entscheiden, ob sie das Undertaking erneut prüft oder eben nicht.
Das niederländische „Solar Magazine“ hatte am Mittwoch berichtet, dass es einen solchen Antrag gibt und die bestehenden Mindestimportpreise sowie Anti-Dumping- und Anti-Subventionszölle für chinesische Photovoltaik-Produkte um mindestens ein Jahr verlängert werden könnten. Die Hersteller-Vereinigung EU Prosun, die die ursprünglichen Anti-Dumping- und Anti-Subventionsmaßnahmen in Europa angestoßen hat, wollte auf Nachfrage von pv magazine den Antrag auf Überprüfung nicht bestätigen.
Allerdings scheint es wahrscheinlich, dass sich von Seiten der europäischen Produzenten um eine Verlängerung der bestehenden Schutzmaßnahmen bemüht wird. Nicht zuletzt, weil Ende Mai die chinesische Regierung eine neue Bekanntmachung veröffentlicht hat, mit der eine spürbare Reduktion der Inlandsnachfrage verbunden sein dürfte. Die chinesischen Photovoltaik-Hersteller, die in den vergangenen Jahren massiv weiter Kapazitäten aufgebaut haben oder dabei sind, müssen sich entsprechend neue Absatzmärkte suchen. Analysten und Experten sind sich einig, dass die bestehenden Überkapazitäten einen neuerlichen Zyklus sinkender Modulpreise weltweit auslösen wird. In den USA hat Präsident Donald Trump mit zusätzlichen Importsteuern von 25 Prozent auf Solarzellen und -module aus China in der vergangenen Woche vorgeschlagen. Sie soll zu den Anfang des Jahres beschlossenen Importzöllen von 25 Prozent bei Photovoltaik-Einfuhren in die USA noch dazu kommen.
Im Herbst 2015 hatte EU Prosun eine erste Auslaufprüfung des Undertakings bei der EU-Kommission beantragt. Im März schließlich entschied sich die Mehrheit der EU-Mitgliedsstaaten dafür die bestehenden Anti-Dumping- und Anti-Subventionsmaßnahmen für die chinesischen Photovoltaik-Produkte um 18 Monate zu verlängern. In der Folge wurde auch ein sukzessives Absinken des Mindestimportpreises, der dabei erstmals separat für mono- und multikristalline Produkte ausgegeben wurde, beschlossen.
Solarpower Europe hatte kurz vor Ablauf der Antragsfrist ein Schreiben an EU-Präsidenten Jean-Claude Juncker geschickt und das Auslaufen der Handelsbeschränkungen spätestens zum 3. September 2018 eingefordert. Der Bundesverband Solarwirtschaft (BSW-Solar), der sich bislang bei dem Thema immer bedeckt gehalten hat, erklärte in einem Schreiben an seine Mitglieder Anfang Juni: „Zölle und Mindestimportpreise werden von großen Teilen der Branche als ungeeignet angesehen. Eine Verlängerung dieser Maßnahmen sollte daher möglichst vermieden werden.“ Allerdings will der Verband im Zuge der Abstimmung seines Zehn-Punkte-Plans zur Energiepolitik diesen noch um geeignete industriepolitische Maßnahmen für die Unternehmen ergänzen. Als Beispiel werden Export- und Forschungsförderung oder auch Finanzierungsabsicherungen genannt.

BNEF: Sinkende Batteriespeicherkosten lassen Photovoltaik und Wind auf 50 Prozent Anteil am Strommix 2050 wachsen

BNEF: Sinkende Batteriespeicherkosten lassen Photovoltaik und Wind auf 50 Prozent Anteil am Strommix 2050 wachsen


Bloomberg New Energy Finance (BNEF) veröffentlichte am Dienstag den neuen Bericht „New Energy Outlook 2018“. Darin schätzen die Analysten, dass sich das globale Wachstum bis 2050 für Solar- und Windenergie drastisch erhöhen wird. Für den deutschen Markt schätzt BNEF, dass bis 2025 der Anteil an erneuerbaren Energien auf 70 Prozent steigen wird und 2050 bei 84 Prozent ankommt. Zu diesem Zeitpunkt werden Photovoltaik und Windenergie allein 74 Prozent des deutschen Strommarktes ausmachen. Als Grund für diese rasante Entwicklung gibt der Bericht die Verringerung fossiler Energieträger um 29 Prozent und den Atomausstieg an.
Dem Bericht zufolge ist davon auszugehen, dass der Anteil von Solar- und Windenergie am globalen Strommix 2050 knapp die Hälfte sein wird. Angetrieben von schnell abfallenden Systemkosten für Photovoltaik und Windkraft sowie stetig preiswerteren Batteriesystemen, werden die Stromgestehungskosten für Photovoltaik dem Bericht zufolge um 71 Prozent bis 2050 sinken. Zwischen 2009 und 2018 seien diese bereits um 77 Prozent gefallen, erläutert BNEF. Ende März berechnete BNEF, dass Stromgestehungskosten für Photovoltaik bei 60,5 Euro pro Megawattstunde im ersten Halbjahr 2018 liegen (abzüglich eventuell eingesetzter Nachführsysteme).
BNEF schreibt weiter in seinem Bericht, dass zwischen 2018 und 2050 eine Gesamtinvestitionssumme von 9,9 Billionen Euro in zusätzliche Stromproduktionskapazität gesteckt werden soll. Davon würden 7,3 Billionen Euro in den Ausbau von Wind- und Solarenergie gesteckt und 1,3 Billionen Euro in den Ausbau von Gaskraftwerken (die Hälfte der Investitionen fließt der Analyse nach in gasbetriebene Kraftwerke zum Spitzenlastausgleich anstatt in Gas-und-Dampf-Kombikraftwerke).
Regionale Unterschiede
Während der globale Anteil von Wind- und Solarenergie am Strommix 2050 etwa 50 Prozent betragen wird, gibt es deutliche regionale Unterschiede. Zum Beispiel rechnet BNEF damit, dass der Anteil von Wind- und Solarenergie in Europa 2050 bei beeindruckenden 87 Prozent liegen wird, in den USA werden es demnach 55 Prozent, in China 62 Prozent und in Indien 75 Prozent sein. In Australien ist die Marktdurchdringung dezentraler Systeme beachtlich hoch. Photovoltaik-Dachanlagen und Heimspeichersysteme werden zur Mitte des Jahrhunderts etwa 43 Prozent des dortigen Strommarktes ausmachen.
Günstige Batteriespeicher
Das Hauptaugenmerk des BNEF Berichts liegt auf Batteriespeichersystemen. Demnach sei der Preis für Lithium-Ion-basierte Speichersysteme seit 2010 um 80 Prozent pro Megawattstunde gefallen. Aufgrund der rasant wachsenden Herstellung von elektrischen Fahrzeugen, durch die 2020er hinweg, nimmt BNEF an, dass sich dieser Trend fortsetzen wird. Weiter ausführend sagt Lega Goldie-Scott, Leiter für Stromspeicher bei BNEF, pv magazine: „Wir erwarten, dass die Kosten für Batteriesysteme auf 83 Euro pro Kilowattstunde im Jahr 2025 und 60 Euro pro Kilowattstunde im Jahr 2030 fallen werden.“
„Für die Herstellung von Batteriezellen für den Gebrauch in Elektrofahrzeugen erwarten wir aufgrund derzeitiger Produktionsplanungen das China, die USA, Korea und Japan führende Rollen auf dem Weltmarkt einnehmen werden. Wir erwarten auch, dass die Produktionskapazitäten in Europa ausgebaut werden. Bislang hat sich ein großer Teil der Batterieproduktion in Osteuropa abgespielt.“
In einem Bericht der Ende Mai veröffentlich wurde gab BNEF bekannt, dass Elektrofahrzeuge 44 Prozent der Neuverkäufe bis 2030 im europäischen Markt, 41 Prozent im chinesischen, 35 Prozent im US und 17 Prozent im japanischen Markt ausmachen werden. Im indischen Markt hingegen liegen die Erwartungen nur bei sieben Prozent der Neuverkäufe. Die Marktdurchdringung bei Bussen wird laut BNEF bedeutend höher sein; der Bericht geht von 80 Prozent der globalen kommunalen Busflotte bis 2040 aus.
„Das Aufkommen günstiger Batteriespeichersysteme bedeutet, dass es zunehmend durchführbar sein wird die Übertragung von Strom aus Wind- und Solarenergie zu verbessern, umso zu ermöglichen, dass diese Technologien auch der Stromnachfrage nachkommen können wenn Dunkelflaute herrscht,“ schreibt Seb Henbest, Leiter von BNEF Europa, mittlerer Osten und Afrika und leitender Autor des NEO 2018. „Resultat dessen wird sein, dass erneuerbare Energieträger mehr und mehr des bestehenden Marktes für Kohle, Kernkraft und Gas einnehmen werden“, fügt er hinzu.
Im Allgemeinen prognostiziert Henbest, dass 475 Milliarden Euro in den Speichersystemmarkt bis 2050 investiert werden. Zwei Drittel hiervon würden ihm zufolge in Systeme auf Netzebene und der Rest in ‚Behind-the-meter‘ Anwendungen, von Haushalten und Industriekunden investiert. Goldie-Scott fügt hinzu, dass das gesamte Investitionsvolumen in stationäre Speichersysteme 2017 rund 1,7 Milliarden Euro betrug.
Im Februar berichtete BNEF, dass in vielen Ländern Speichersysteme immer noch auf staatliche Subventionen und oft unregelmäßige Förderprogramme angewiesen sind. Der durchschnittliche Preis für Batteriespeicher bleibt dem Bericht gemäß unerschwinglich für viele potenzielle dezentrale Verbraucher und das obwohl die Kosten um 24 Prozent auf €180 pro Kilowattstunde im letzten Jahr gefallen sind.
Diese Kostenentwicklung bringt Speichertechnologien näher an das Preisniveau anderer Netzquellen heran, laut BNEF bleibt die Ausbaurate dennoch gering, da die Strategien zur Förderung und effektiveren Integration der Technologie zumeist zusammenhangslos daherkommt. Abschließend zeigt der Bericht, dass 2017 mit 1,17 Gigawatt eine Rekordsumme zusätzlicher netzgekoppelte Speichersysteme installiert wurde.

Solarpower Europe optimistisch für Entwicklung des Photovoltaik-Weltmarktes

Solarpower Europe optimistisch für Entwicklung des Photovoltaik-Weltmarktes


Auf der Konferenz der Intersolar Europe in München hat Solarpower Europe seinen „Global Markt Outlook for Solar Power 2018-2022“ vorgestellt. Der Verband erwartet demnach für die kommenden fünf Jahre eine weiter steigenden Photovoltaik-Nachfrage. Nachdem im vergangenen Jahr weltweit Photovoltaik-Anlage mit 99,1 Gigawatt zugebaut wurden, sollte in diesem Jahr die 100-Gigawatt-Marke übertroffen werden. Bis 2022 sei mit einer neu installierten Photovoltaik-Leistung von 621,7 Gigawatt zu rechnen, so der Verband am Dienstag.
Auch die Zahl der Länder, die die Ein-Gigawatt-Marke übertreffen, steigt immer weiter an. 2016 waren es noch sieben Märkte über dieser Marke, 2017 dann neun und in diesem Jahr werden es 14 Länder sein, heißt es weiter. Dabei sei auch in Europa eine Marktdynamik zu verzeichnen. Der Zubau habe sich von 7,0 auf 9,2 Gigawatt im vergangenen Jahr erhöht, wobei vor allem die Türkei zum Wachstum beigetragen habe. Beim Vergleich der Zubauzahlen in den 28 EU-Mitgliedsstaaten zeigt sich eine Stagnation bei rund 5,9 Gigawatt 2016 und 2017, wie es weiter heißt.
In den kommenden Jahren sei jedoch von einem weiteren Wachstum des EU-Photovoltaik-Marktes auszugehen. Für dieses Jahr erwartet Solarpower Europe eine Wachstumsrate von 45 Prozent und 2019 von 59 Prozent. Für den Weltmarkt rechnet die Vereinigung in diesem Jahr mit einer Steigerung der Nachfrage um 3,5 Prozent auf 102.6 Gigawatt neu installierte Leistung. Für China geht Solarpower Europe von einem Rückgang des Marktvolumens auf 39 Gigawatt in diesem Jahr aus, nachdem die Regierung in einer Bekanntmachung Änderungen ihrer Politik Ende Mai bekanntgab. Im vergangenen Jahr lag der Photovoltaik-Zubau in China bei 53 Gigawatt und machte damit erstmals mehr als die Hälfte der neu installierten Leistung weltweit aus.
Auf der Veranstaltung sprach Solarpower Europe-Präsident Christian Westermeier davon, dass 2017 ein „weiteres historisches Jahr für den Photovoltaik-Sektor“ gewesen sei. So sei die Photovoltaik stärker als jede andere Stromerzeugungstechnologie im vergangenen Jahr ausgebaut worden – sogar mehr als alle fossilen Energieträger zusammen. „Photovoltaik ist auf der Gewinnerstraße und auf dem Weg die dominierende Energiequelle des 21. Jahrhunderts zu werden“, so Westermeier.
Solarpower Europe hat auch seine Szenarien für die Entwicklung der kommenden Jahre nachgebessert. Sie seien stärker als in früheren Berichten, heißt es. So geht Solarpower Europe in seinem mittleren Szenario nun von einer installierten Photovoltaik-Leistung von 871 Gigawatt im Jahr 2021 aus – das sei 13 Prozent höher als zuvor angenommen. Bis zum Ende dieses Jahres dürfte die kumulierte Leistung weltweit bei 505 Gigawatt liegen. 2022 könnte so die Terawatt-Ära eingeleitet werden. Nach dem optimistischsten Szenario auch schon ein Jahr früher.

Consorcio noruego adquire proyecto de 117 MW en Argentina

Consorcio noruego adquire proyecto de 117 MW en Argentina


Un consorcio noruego formado por la promotora solar Scatec Solar y el grupo petrolero Equinor (anteriormente conocido como Statoil) acordó comprar un proyecto solar de 117 MW a la empresa portuguesa de energía renovable Martifer Renewables SGPS SA. Los términos económicos de la transacción no se hicieron públicos.
El proyecto Guañizuil II A se adjudicó un PPA de 20 años en la segunda fase de la tercera ronda (Ronda 2) del programa de Argentina para proyectos de energía solar y renovable a gran escala RenovAr. El proyecto está ubicado en la provincia de San Juan, junto con otros tres proyectos seleccionados en la misma fase de la ronda, y venderá electricidad a la Compañía Administradora del Mercado Mayorista Eléctrico (CAMMESA) durante 20 años a un precio de $ 50 / MWh.
Scatec dijo que planea comenzar la construcción para fines de este año, y que la finalización está programada para fines de 2019. El proyecto será propiedad en un 50 % por Scatec y en un 50 % por Equinor. La inversión para el proyecto se estima en alrededor de $ 95 millones. El proyecto será financiado en un 40 % con capital propio por parte de ambas compañías, que aportarán en un 50 % cada una, y en un 60 % con un préstamo puente del mismo grupo Equinor. Una vez finalizada la instalación, se espera que una financiación a largo plazo provenga de otra entidad.
“Con este acuerdo nos estamos asegurando nuestro primer proyecto en el creciente mercado solar de Argentina. Vemos varias oportunidades adicionales en el país basadas en la excelente irradiación solar y el respaldo gubernamental a las energías renovables”, dijo el CEO de Scatec, Raymond Carlsen.
Statoil decidió cambiar nombre en Equinor para reflejar su transición hacia las energías limpias en marzo. A principios de octubre, realizó su primera inversión en energía solar al adquirir una participación del 40 % en un proyecto de 162 MW que posee Scatec en Brasil. Además, Scatec dijo haber creado una empresa conjunta 50/50 con Equinor en Brasil para la construcción de proyectos fotovoltaicos a gran escala en el país durante el próximo año.

Nueva planta en Brasil de Assuruá Energia Solar y Pöyry

Nueva planta en Brasil de Assuruá Energia Solar y Pöyry


La empresa finlandesa Pöyry de ingeniería y consultoría técnica ha sido escogida por parte de Assuruá Energia, filial de la estadounidense Vientos Solutions, para llevar a cabo el proyecto Verde Vale 3.
Ubicada en el sur del estado de Bahía, la planta tendrá una capacidad instalada de 16 MW, y ya tiene un contrato de compra de energía de 20 años, firmado en la subasta de energía 2015 celebrada por la Agencia Nacional de Energía Eléctrica de Brasil (ANEEL ).
La planta ya está en construcción y se prevé que comience a inyectar energía a la red a finales de julio de este año.
Es el segundo proyecto que las dos empresas llevan a cabo de manera conjunta en Brasil, donde una planta de 30 MW entró en operaciones en el primer trimestre de este año.

Mujeres indígenas de Chile aprenden a desarrollar la fotovoltaica

Mujeres indígenas de Chile aprenden a desarrollar la fotovoltaica


Susana García Mamani se reunió con el Intendente Miguel Ángel Quezada, la seremi de Energía, Ximena Cancino, y la seremi de la Mujer y Equidad de Género, Milca Pardo, para contar su experiencia sobre una pasantía que realizó junto a otras dos representantes de pueblos originarios en la India, donde recibieron formación para instalar y operar sistemas fotovoltaicos que utilizarán fundamentalmente para el autoconsumo.
Se trata de Zunilda Flores, de la comunidad de Quebe, Susana García, de Ancuaque y Silvia Huarachi, de Bajo Soga, que han recibido una formación de seis meses destinada a entender el funcionamiento de sistemas fotovoltaicos, que ahora podrán construir, reparar y mantener.
“Para mi es fundamental este paso para iluminar nuestras comunidades y tener una mejor calidad de vida, de tal manera ha sido muy importante reunirnos con el Intendente, quien ha mostrado interés en las energías renovables y ante la necesidad que tenemos las comunidades del interior de seguir avanzando en este tema, que es tan importante para nuestras familias”, señaló Susana García.
La representante de las mujeres indígenas explicó que anhela llevar electricidad a las localidades para desarrollar actividades culturales tradicionales y organizacionales.
“Conocimos la experiencia de estas mujeres cuando lanzamos la Ruta Energética para nuestra Región de Tarapacá, en mayo, y nos pareció fascinante cómo, desde localidades aisladas en el Tamarugal viajaron con mucho entusiasmo y ganas a aprender sobre las energías renovables”, señaló el intendente Quezada.

Nueva planta de 157 MW pendiente de aprobación en Perú

Nueva planta de 157 MW pendiente de aprobación en Perú


Bow Power, una joint venture formada por la empresa de inversión Global Infraestructure Partners (GIP) y el Grupo ACS, vinculada al grupo español Cobra, ha presentado una propuesta para instalar una planta solar en la costa sur de Perú. El proyecto supondría una inversión de US$ 215 millones, que, de ser aprobada, sería la mayor llevada a cabo ene este segmento en el país hasta la fecha.
El proyecto, denominado Las Dunas, contaría con más de 534.000 mil módulos fotovoltaicos, y también incluye una subestación eléctrica y una línea de transmisión. La planta generaría 157 MW megavatios y tardaría 14 meses en construirse. Ocuparía un área de 398 hectáreas.
En marzo de este año, Enel Green Power puso en operación la central Rubí de 144,48 MW, la mayor del país, que ha supuesto una inversión de US$170 millones. Engie Energía Perú anunció a finales de mayo la entrada en operación de la central Intipampa de 40 MW, con un desembolso de unos US $52 millones.

Spain: EPC contract signed for 300 MW subsidy-free PV plant

Spain: EPC contract signed for 300 MW subsidy-free PV plant


Metka, a subsidiary of Athens-headquartered Mytilineos, yesterday signed a €192.5 million contract in Athens with Talasol Solar S.L., owned by Ellomay Capital Ltd, to undertake the EPC work for one of Spain’s largest unsubsidized solar PV projects, the so-called Talasol Project.
The project will be located in the municipality of Talaván, near Cáceres, in the southern region of Extremadura.
In a statement released, Metka said that apart from the EPC work, the scope of the collaboration includes “the ancillary facilities for injecting power into the grid, including a 400 kV step-up substation, the high voltage interconnection line to the point of connection to the grid and performance of two years of operation and maintenance (O&M) services.”
A spokesperson for Metka additionally told pv magazine that the company “hopes the construction will start in the fourth quarter of 2018 and the project duration will be 16 months.”
Earlier in January, Israel’s Ellomay Capital Ltd said that depending on the EPC cost, it expected that “the Talasol Project’s CAPEX will amount to approximately €200 million, including development costs of approximately €20 million and interest of approximately €7 million.”
Financing
When asked about project financing, Metka preferred not to provide any details, stating that “since we are the EPC, it [financing] is handled by the owner.”
pv magazine, however, previously reported that Ellomay had entered into an agreement with Germany’s Deutsche Bank for the structuring of non-recourse senior debt financing for the project, with the possibility that the European Investment Bank (EIB) will also inject financing into the Talasol project.
In January, Ellomay said that “the power produced by the Talasol Project is expected to be sold by Talasol to the open market for the then current market power price.” It added that it has secured a binding term sheet with an undisclosed international hedge provider, which effectively hedges the PV farm’s power purchase agreement (PPA) against price fluctuations.
Thus, should the wholesale market electricity price go “below a price underpinned by the PPA, the Hedging Provider will pay Talasol the difference between the market price and the underpinned price, and if the market price is above the underpinned price, Talasol will pay the Hedging Provider the difference between the market price and the underpinned price,” said Ellomay Capital.
The hedged production under the PPA is currently expected to be between 3,500 to 3,700 GWh during a fixed term of 10 years, commencing shortly after commercial operation of the Talasol project commences.
Signalling a new era
The defining characteristic of this project is that is subsidy-free, signaling a new era for renewable energy development in Spain. This sentiment was underlined at Genera 2018, which was held June 13 to 15 in Madrid, Spain. Among the four key solar takeaways from the event was the feeling that the renewed activity in Spain’s large-scale sector is helping to reanimate the country’s solar industry.
Indeed, with around 3.9 GW of allocated solar power in last year’s auction – all of which is due to come online by the end of next year – and more than 800 MW of solar parks that have already secured a private PPA, Spain is on track to once again become Europe’s largest market, in 2019. “Already this year we may see the first unsubsidized solar parks being connected to the grid, as a result of continuing activity in the private PPA segment,” UNEF president Donoso told pv magazine at Genera.

Scatec, Equinor acquire 117 MW PV project in Argentina

Scatec, Equinor acquire 117 MW PV project in Argentina


A Norwegian consortium, formed by solar developer Scatec Solar and oil group Equinor (formerly known as Statoil), has agreed to buy a 117 MW solar project from Portuguese renewable energy company, Martifer Renewables SGPS SA for an undisclosed sum.
The Guañizuil II A project was awarded a 20-year PPA in the second phase of the third round (Ronda 2) of Argentina’s procurement program for large-scale solar and renewable energy projects, RenovAr. The project is located in the province of San Juan, along with other three projects selected in the same phase of the round, and will sell electricity to the Electricity Wholesale Market Administrator, CAMMESA, for 20 years at a price of $50/MWh.
Scatec said it plans to start construction by the end of this year, with completion scheduled for the end of 2019. The project will be owned 50% by Scatec and 50% by Equinor. Capital expenditure for the project is estimated at around $95 million. Forty percent of the project will be financed using equity from both companies, which will each contribute half, while 60% will come from a bridge loan provided by Equinor. Upon completion of the facility, long-term project financing is expected to come from a third party.
“With this agreement we are securing our first project in the growing solar market in Argentina. We see several additional opportunities in the country based on excellent solar irradiation as well as government support for renewables,” said Scatec CEO, Raymond Carlsen.
Statoil rebranded as Equinor to reflect its transition to clean energies in March. Earlier in October, it made its first investment in solar by acquiring a 40% stake in a 162 MW project that Scatec owns in Brazil. Furthermore, Scatec said it has created a 50/50 joint venture with Statoil in Brazil, which is expected to build and operate large-scale PV projects in the country over the next year.